Armstrong's fake Viagra saga ends without restitution to drug companies.
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At a hearing before US Fedral Judge Ricardo Martinez in Seattle WA Tuesday, Jim Armstrong and his son Gregory were not ordered to pay the $44,000 restitution requested by the manufacturers of viagra cialis online pharmacy pharmacy and Ciallis pills, fake versions of which formed the basis of the Armstrong's convictions last February.



Defense lawyers argued that restitution was not appropriate as the fake pills had been seized from Jim Armstrong before they could be smuggled into Canada and sold by Gregory in Vancouver nightclubs.



Jim has said in interviews that he has a full explanation for his actions, but has not yet felt able to present it, in part out of concern for the welfare of his son, who is in an American prison serving a 12 month sentence.

Teaching Medical Ethics in India
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During the four weeks I've just spent in India (I'm at the Amsterdam airport now, on my way home) I asked two questions about ethics and ethics education: 1) Can the field of medical ethics, which is so well established in the west, contribute to improving health in India? 2) Insofar as the answer is yes - how?

Medical ethics is not well developed as an academic field in India. To the best of my knowledge there are no medical school departments of ethics. Minimal curricular hours are devoted to the subject.

I believe that ethics education can make important contributions to health care systems and ultimately to health itself. But I formed this view in the U.S. In India I challenged myself with my favorite question - "so what?" So what that ethics education in India is rudimentary? What difference could more attention to ethics education make in a country with more than a billion people including a rural and urban population barely living at a subsistance level that is larger than the entire U.S.?

I was able to have a series of meetings with people who were generous with their time and thoughts. They delineated four major areas of concern:

1. Improving health status and access to care for the poor - both rural and urban. Several people feared that in its zeal for economic development the Indian government is starving the public sector and overly relying on a private health system. One described a vicious cycle in which as the public lost confidence in the poorly funded public system that loss of confidence was cited as justification for further reliance on private and for profit "solutions."

2. Dealing with environmental health hazards. As an example, yesterday's Times of India descibed staggeringly high levels of multiple drugs in the Andra Pradesh water supply - a result of dumping by pharmaceutical manufacturers. An activist physician stated "It's a global concern - European countries and the US are protecting their environment and importing the drugs at the cost of the people in developing countries." A village woman added -"When the local leaders come, we offer them water and they won't take it."

3. Addressing continuing stigma and ostracism of people living with HIV/AIDS. The National AIDS Control Organization (NACO) and its state branches and multiple NGOs have worked hard in this area, but stigma and ostracism continue to be major problems. (If you're interested in this area, the Yahoo AIDS India e-Forum is a great place to start.)

4. Responding to the torrent of clinical trials from the U.S. and Europe. India has an enormous population of poor people who have thus far been relatively easy to enroll in drug trials that are often poorly regulated (see here for a previous posting on this topic).

These aren't subtle or obscure issues. Like India itself - they're big. Does ethics education have anything of value to offer? I think it does.

If I were consulting to a medical school in India about establishing an ethics curriculum, here are three of the suggestions I would make:

1. I like to think of ethics in terms of three As - Analysis ("what is the right thing to do in this situation?"), Advocacy ("let's do the right thing"), and Administration ("what systems and procedures do we need to help the right thing happen?"). The analytic component , which is dominant in U.S. ethics education, would be less central at the start in India. The key goal of the program should be to encourage health professionals (and other stakeholders) to include responsibility for promoting population health as part of their professional identity, and to suggest ways in which they (whatever else they do) can (a) advocate for improved population health and (b) contribute to administrative measures that support positive actions.

2. Words in a lecture (a more central mode of teaching in India than in the U.S.) or on a page won't foster advocacy skills or administrative understanding. The new ethics education program should be guided by Albert Schweitzer's famous precept: "Example is not the main thing in influencing others - it is the only thing." Students should be exposed to health professionals who have found ways to put population health ideals into action. If the medical school were in proximity to the Vivekananda Memorial online pharmacy viagra in Saragur, in the state of Karnataka, I would want them to meet with the staff I encountered there (see my posting on the Vivekananda hospital) and for interested students to work there, even for a short time.

3. Finally, I would want the program to be linked to an important area of population health in the local community. If the school was in Chennai, in the state of Tamil Nadu, where the headquarters of the Indian Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS, an NGO founded and run by HIV+ people, is located, learning about the difficulties HIV+ people - especially the poor - enounter in seeking work, accessing care, and maintaining ties with family and community, would be a rich learning opportunity. I would hope that faculty would not simply profess ethics but would put their professions into action, and take students with them in doing so.

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Sep 13, 2010 12:49:09

Breakthroughs in Mobile Technology for Medicine - WSJ.com
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Sex and Health
hedilure
Folks

Here I'm connecting some dots -- maybe eventually they will form a picture.

---------
Margaret Carter wrote in a previous blog entry here:
Almost as wild a fantasy is that sometime the day will come when our entire population will be entitled as a civil right to the kind of excellent and almost-free care I received at the Walter Reed army hospital. But that is politics, and I suppose a no-no for this space. :)
---------

For my June 2008 column, I review Stewards of the Flame, an adult SF novel by the famous SF writer Sylvia Engdahl. Sylvia tackles Margaret's subject with a straight line extrapolation in true SF style -- AND adds a flaming romance laced through the entire discussion of the philosophy of medical practice.

If you're interested, see http://www.simegen.com/reviews/rereadablebooks/2008/
And scroll down to JUNE. These columns will become available on this page sometime after publication date when they appear in print in The Monthly Aspectarian.

And with all the political noise lately, I have been thinking again about the purchase cialis care delivery system -- and how we define "health."
----------------
Then Rowena Cherry wrote in her Sunday blog:However, if "sex-driven" were to be officially as important as plot and character, I'd also want to include action-driven, idea-driven, world- driven... and life (and literature) would get complicated. Some will say "action" is "plot".
----------------

And instantly I thought of a thousand things to discuss with regard to sex-driven plots. I learned a LOT about that topic from Marion Zimmer Bradley. I point the student at MZB's novel CATCH TRAP -- the car racing scene is a sex scene but you have to know how the writer constructed it that way to see it. Her Darkover novel, World Wreckers has the BEST alien sex scene I've ever read, and the entire plot of that novel is sex-driven.

She taught me how it can be that sexuality is actually the basis of all Art. Of music and dance, and imaginative story-telling, too.

Poul Anderson taught us how it is that all cultures, even non-human galaxy-spanning cultures, are rooted in the basic biology of sexuality (or at least of reproduction).

Our mores and religious and philosophical notions always take reproductive imperatives into account. How creatures reproduce determines the parameters of the cultures they can build to allow them to live together - even determines how large the groups can be and how much territory they require (population density).

So here we are in a world on the brink of plague (bird flu or otherwise), famine (bee hives dying off mysteriously), war (every direction you look), and death (an aging population). The Four Horsemen ride, and other than antacids, the most popular medication being counterfeited today has to be for various perceived sexual dysfunctions.

With all today's emphasis on pharmacological masking of sexual dysfunction, it's a wonder more romance novels don't tackle that philosophical conundrum.

What is the philosophical connection between physical sex, cheap cialis, reproduction and love?

Where does the sexual experience come from? If it is primarily physical, of what value would such an experience be with a non-human partner? Or turn it around: what value would a non-human partner get from sex with a human?

Again, if sex is primarily a reproductive act, why mess around with a member of a different species?

It seems to me that the "aliendjinnromance" title of this co-blog implies that romance, as we discuss it here, is at least partly "magical" -- i.e. a thing of the spirit at least as much, if not more, than of the body.

So why is "aliendjinnromance" related to Science Fiction?

Perhaps romance, and its consequential full, ripe love, is primarily of the spirit. The healthy spirit seeks, and often finds, the true mate regardless of the body.

Thus, as soon as travel on earth became possible for large populations and people began mixing, intermarriages among different races became common.

Using a straight line extrapolation, as Sylvia Engdahl did for her medical novel, we definitely see that dispersing humans throughout the galaxy where they would encounter non-human people would produce intermarriages.

The science fiction premises possible in such a galactic civilization could explore issues of health, but most especially sexual health. What if an organ size mismatch could be fixed by medication or surgery? (would he?) What if frequency or volume adjustments had to be made to accommodate -- would he? Would she?

What about a human who was sexually dysfunctional falling for a non-human who didn't notice any impairment? But what if the impairment bothered the human who tried to fix it pharmacologically?

What would the non-human's opinion of pharmacological masking of sexual dysfunction be?

Oh, just think of the inter-galactic spam!

Jacqueline Lichtenberg
http://www.simegen.com/jl/

Sex and Health
hedilure
Folks

Here I'm connecting some dots -- maybe eventually they will form a picture.

---------
Margaret Carter wrote in a previous blog entry here:
Almost as wild a fantasy is that sometime the day will come when our entire population will be entitled as a civil right to the kind of excellent and almost-free care I received at the Walter Reed army hospital. But that is politics, and I suppose a no-no for this space. :)
---------

For my June 2008 column, I review Stewards of the Flame, an adult SF novel by the famous SF writer Sylvia Engdahl. Sylvia tackles Margaret's subject with a straight line extrapolation in true SF style -- AND adds a flaming romance laced through the entire discussion of the philosophy of medical practice.

If you're interested, see http://www.simegen.com/reviews/rereadablebooks/2008/
And scroll down to JUNE. These columns will become available on this page sometime after publication date when they appear in print in The Monthly Aspectarian.

And with all the political noise lately, I have been thinking again about the order cialis care delivery system -- and how we define "health."
----------------
Then Rowena Cherry wrote in her Sunday blog:However, if "sex-driven" were to be officially as important as plot and character, I'd also want to include action-driven, idea-driven, world- driven... and life (and literature) would get complicated. Some will say "action" is "plot".
----------------

And instantly I thought of a thousand things to discuss with regard to sex-driven plots. I learned a LOT about that topic from Marion Zimmer Bradley. I point the student at MZB's novel CATCH TRAP -- the car racing scene is a sex scene but you have to know how the writer constructed it that way to see it. Her Darkover novel, World Wreckers has the BEST alien sex scene I've ever read, and the entire plot of that novel is sex-driven.

She taught me how it can be that sexuality is actually the basis of all Art. Of music and dance, and imaginative story-telling, too.

Poul Anderson taught us how it is that all cultures, even non-human galaxy-spanning cultures, are rooted in the basic biology of sexuality (or at least of reproduction).

Our mores and religious and philosophical notions always take reproductive imperatives into account. How creatures reproduce determines the parameters of the cultures they can build to allow them to live together - even determines how large the groups can be and how much territory they require (population density).

So here we are in a world on the brink of plague (bird flu or otherwise), famine (bee hives dying off mysteriously), war (every direction you look), and death (an aging population). The Four Horsemen ride, and other than antacids, the most popular medication being counterfeited today has to be for various perceived sexual dysfunctions.

With all today's emphasis on pharmacological masking of sexual dysfunction, it's a wonder more romance novels don't tackle that philosophical conundrum.

What is the philosophical connection between physical sex, cheap cialis, reproduction and love?

Where does the sexual experience come from? If it is primarily physical, of what value would such an experience be with a non-human partner? Or turn it around: what value would a non-human partner get from sex with a human?

Again, if sex is primarily a reproductive act, why mess around with a member of a different species?

It seems to me that the "aliendjinnromance" title of this co-blog implies that romance, as we discuss it here, is at least partly "magical" -- i.e. a thing of the spirit at least as much, if not more, than of the body.

So why is "aliendjinnromance" related to Science Fiction?

Perhaps romance, and its consequential full, ripe love, is primarily of the spirit. The healthy spirit seeks, and often finds, the true mate regardless of the body.

Thus, as soon as travel on earth became possible for large populations and people began mixing, intermarriages among different races became common.

Using a straight line extrapolation, as Sylvia Engdahl did for her medical novel, we definitely see that dispersing humans throughout the galaxy where they would encounter non-human people would produce intermarriages.

The science fiction premises possible in such a galactic civilization could explore issues of health, but most especially sexual health. What if an organ size mismatch could be fixed by medication or surgery? (would he?) What if frequency or volume adjustments had to be made to accommodate -- would he? Would she?

What about a human who was sexually dysfunctional falling for a non-human who didn't notice any impairment? But what if the impairment bothered the human who tried to fix it pharmacologically?

What would the non-human's opinion of pharmacological masking of sexual dysfunction be?

Oh, just think of the inter-galactic spam!

Jacqueline Lichtenberg
http://www.simegen.com/jl/

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